5.Improving taste of alcohol-free Beer

Consumers often complain that alcohol-free beer is tasteless, but some of the aromas it is lacking can be carried across from regular beer. Researchers have developed the technique and a panel of tasters has confirmed its effectiveness. The alcohol in beer acts as a solvent for a variety of aromatic compounds; therefore, when it is eliminated, as in non-alcoholic beers, the final product loses aromas and some of its taste. It is difficult to recover these compounds, but researchers have done just this using a pervaporation process.

The alcohol in beer acts as a solvent for a variety of aromatic compounds; therefore, when it is eliminated, as in non-alcoholic beers, the final product loses aromas and some of its taste. It is difficult to recover these compounds, but it could be done using a pervaporation process.

This technique consists in using a semipermeable membrane to separate two fractions from alcoholic beer: one liquid phase in which alcohol is retained, and another gaseous phase, where the aromatic compounds come in. Then, this gaseous phase can be condensed and the aromatic compounds extracted and added to non-alcoholic beer.

The taste is improved, and thus the quality of this 'alcohol-free' beer. A majority of consumers prefer the beer with aromas to the original. This technique cannot yet capture all the aromas and tastes associated with alcoholic beer, but it does show progress in making 'alcohol-free' varieties more palatable for the consumer.

 
 
 

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